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Sunday, November 7, 2010

Free Live Stream Pacquiao - Margarito

Free Live Stream Pacquiao - Margarito

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Watch UFC 119 Live Streaming Online Free [HD]

UFC 119 Official Preview Frank Mir vs Mirko Cro Cop

How to Date a Med Student

Dating a med student? Check out these tips for a “healthy” relationship.
1. Don’t expect to see them. Ever.
2. Accept the fact they will have many affairs. With their books.
3. Learn to hide your “ew, gross” reactions when they tell you all the stuff you never wanted to know about your bodily functions.
4. Support them when they come home after each test, upset because they failed—and gently remind them after they get their well above passing grade how unnecessary the “I’m going to fail out of medical school and never become an MD” dramatics are.
5. Each week they will have a new illness. Some will be extremely rare, others will be more mundane. Doesn’t matter. They will be certain they have it (no second opinions necessary.) Med school can, and will, turn even the sanest into a hypochondriac. Date them for long enough, and you’ll become one too.

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6. There will be weeks you’ll forget you even have a boyfriend—friends will ask how he is and you’ll say, “What? Who? Oh….right. He’s well…I think.”
7. They’ll make you hyper-aware that germs are everywhere and on everything. Even though you used to walk into your home with your shoes on, and sit on your bed in the same clothes you just wore while riding the subway, or sat on a public bench in, you’ll become far too disgusted to ever do it again. Believe me, it’s going to get bad…you’ll watch yourself transform into the anal retentive person you swore you’d never become. And when you witness others perform these same acts that, before you began dating your med student, you spent your entire life doing too, you’ll wince and wonder, “Ew! How can they do that? Don’t they know how many germs and bacteria they’re spreading??!”
8. Romantic date = Chinese take-out in front of the TV on their 10 minute study break.
9. A vacation together consists of a trip down the street to Walgreens for new highlighters and printer paper.
10. Their study habits will make you feel like a complete slacker. For them, hitting the books 8-to-10 hours a day is not uncommon, nor difficult. You’ll wonder how you ever managed to pass school on your meager one hour of studying per night.
11. They’re expected to know everything. Everything! The name of the 8 billion-lettered, German sounding cell that lives in the depths of your inner ear, the technical term for the “no one’s ever heard of this disease” disease that exists only on one foot of the Southern tip of the African continent. But ask them if your knee is swollen, or what you should do to tame your mucous-filled cough, or why the heck your head feels like someone’s been drilling through it for oil for two weeks straight, and they won’t have a clue.
12. “My brain’s filled with so much information, I can’t be expected to remember THAT!” will be the standard excuse for forgetting anniversaries, birthdays, and, if you get this far, probably the birth of your first-born.
13. You’ll need friends with unending patience who pretend never to get sick of listening to your endless venting and complaints. Or, you’ll need to pay a therapist who will pretend never to get sick of listening to your endless venting and complaints.
But take this all with a grain of salt. It’s not like I’m speaking from experience or anything…

What are microexpressions?

After taking just one look at someone, why do we sometimes immediately know we don’t like him or her? We usually chalk this up to instinct, intuition or a “gut feeling,” but researchers have found that there’s something more going on that just barely meets the eye — microexpressions.
The human face is a medium, or a sign vehicle, that sends us a message. When we “read” a face, there’s quite a lot of data to sift through. One part of the medium is its basic structure and muscle tone. Is it long and angular or round and chubby? Often, we’ll see a stranger’s face and flip through a mental Rolodex of sorts, matching the shape of the new face with ones we already know. We also perceive changes that have taken place, such as scarring, weathering of the skin or wrinkles. Taking into account artificial adornments, such as eyeglasses, makeup, tattoos or piercings, we make personal judgments based on what the person has added by choice.
­Providing more immediate information are the changes in a person’s face, such as smiles, frowns or scowls. These changes provide us with the most obvious information about someone’s mood or immediate intentions. Expressions represent the person’s intended message, the one he or she is trying to convey. A person trying to gain your trust will smile. Someone trying to scare you will scowl.
­When we communicate, we try to collect as much verbal and nonverbal information as possible. We also try to control the outgoing expressive information we display to others in order to:
* Maximize our understanding of the people we interact with
* Gain perspective on the situation
* Protect ourselves against harm, deception, embarrassment or loss of social standing
 * Guide, assure or manipulate the perceptions of another

Data Recovery

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FINDS AND RECOVERS DELETED, LOST, AND DAMAGED DATA FROM ALL DRIVES AND FORMAT TYPES, INCLUDING:
  • Hard drives
  • Floppy drives
  • Music players
  • Digital cameras
  • PDA’s
  • Formatted, damaged, or repartitioned media
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System Requirements
Microsoft Windows 98, Me, 2000, XP or Vista
128 MB RAM
10 MB of available hard disk space
P2 400MHz (600MHz recommended)

Phobias


Everyone has at least one phobia, myself included. A phobia is defined as an irrational fear of something- although for a phobic this fear seems very real and very rational. Some phobics can even suffer from panic attacks, which are signified by heavy breathing, profuse sweating, a feeling of dizziness, and sometimes even fainting. Phobias can affect everyday life, and many phobics would rather rearrange their lives than face their fears if given a choice.
Achluophobia – Fear of darkness.
Acrophobia – Fear of heights.
Agliophobia – Fear of pain.
Agoraphobia- Fear of open spaces or crowds.
Aichmophobia – Fear of needles or pointed objects.
Amaxophobia – Fear of riding in a car.
Androphobia – Fear of men.
Anthropophobia – Fear of people or society.
Aphenphosmphobia – Fear of being touched.
Arachnophobia – Fear of spiders.
Arithmophobia – Fear of numbers.
Astraphobia – Fear of thunder and lightening.
Ataxophobia – Fear of disorder or untidiness.
Atelophobia – Fear of imperfection.
Atychiphobia – Fear of failure.
Autophobia – Fear of being alone.
Bacteriophobia – Fear of bacteria
Batrachophobia – Fear of amphibians.
Belonephobia – Fear of pins and needles.
Bibliophobia – Fear of books.
Botanophobia – Fear of plants.
Cacophobia – Fear of ugliness.
Catagelophobia – Fear of being ridiculed.
Catoptrophobia – Fear of mirrors.
Chionophobia – Fear of snow.
Chromophobia – Fear of colors.
Chronomentrophobia – Fear of clocks.
Claustrophobia – Fear of confined spaces.
Coulrophobia – Fear of clowns.
Cyberphobia – Fear of computers.
Cynophobia – Fear of dogs.
Dendrophobia – Fear of trees.
Dentophobia – Fear of dentists.
Domatophobia – Fear of houses.
Dystychiphobia – Fear of accidents.
Ecophobia – Fear of the home.
Elurophobia – Fear of cats.
Entomophobia – Fear of insects.
Ephebiphobia – Fear of teenagers.
Equinophobia – Fear of horses.
Gamophobia – Fear of marriage.
Genuphobia – Fear of knees.
Glossophobia – Fear of speaking in public.
Gynophobia – Fear of women.
Heliophobia – Fear of the sun.
Hemophobia – Fear of blood.
Herpetophobia – Fear of reptiles.
Hydrophobia – Fear of water.
Iatrophobia – Fear of doctors.
Insectophobia – Fear of insects.
Koinoniphobia – Fear of rooms.
Leukophobia – Fear of the color white.
Lilapsophobia – Fear of tornadoes and hurricanes.
Lockiophobia – Fear of childbirth.
Mageirocophobia – Fear of cooking.
Melanophobia – Fear of the color black.
Microphobia – Fear of small things.
Mysophobia – Fear of dirt and germs.
Necrophobia – Fear of death or dead things.
Noctiphobia – Fear of the night.
Nosocomephobia – Fear of hospitals.
Obesophobia – Fear of gaining weight.
Octophobia – Fear of the figure 8.
Ombrophobia – Fear of rain.
Ophidiophobia – Fear of snakes.
Ornithophobia – Fear of birds.
Papyrophobia – Fear of paper.
Pathophobia – Fear of disease.
Pedophobia – Fear of children.
Philophobia – Fear of love.
Phobophobia – Fear of phobias.
Podophobia – Fear of feet.
Porphyrophobia – Fear of the color purple.
Pteridophobia – Fear of ferns.
Pteromerhanophobia – Fear of flying.
Pyrophobia – Fear of fire.
Scolionophobia – Fear of school.
Selenophobia – Fear of the moon.
Sociophobia – Fear of social evaluation.
Somniphobia – Fear of sleep.
Tachophobia – Fear of speed.
Technophobia – Fear of technology.
Tonitrophobia – Fear of thunder.
Trypanophobia – Fear of injections

Struggling to learn mixed martial arts

Struggling hard to learn the basics of mixed martial arts .(a full contact combat sport that allows a wide variety of fighting techniques, from a mixture of martial arts traditions and non-traditions, to be used in competitions. The rules allow the use of striking and grappling techniques, both while standing and on the ground. Such competitions allow martial artists of different backgrounds to compete. The term may also be used, less correctly, to describe hybrid martial arts styles.)

I always got bruces, body pain and even injuries such as leg and neck…..but it was fun learn to defend your self and at the same time you are engaging into a hybrid sport and it is also a great past time during weekends.